MAGUINDANAO MASS MURDERERS and the U.P. SERIAL CAT KILLER

I just saw this statement from the Philippine Animal Welfare Society (PAWS) and I couldn’t help but think of the Maguindanao mass murderers. Here’s the PAWS PRESS STATEMENT:

> U.P. TRIBUNAL DECISION: STOMPING A KITTEN TO DEATH IN UP IS NOT “MISCONDUCT”
>
> To the great disappointment and shock of animal welfare advocates, the UP Student Disciplinary Tribunal in its two-page decision dated November 5, 2009 dismissed the case filed against Joseph Carlo Candare, a BS Physics major of the UP College of Science for allegedly deliberately stomping a kitten to death last April 13, 2009.
>
> Candare earned the ire of many animal lovers, and consequently, many animal rights groups for bragging about the incident on his personal log on the world wide web (web log or “blog”).
>
> Excerpts from the infamous blog are as follows:

> “I pulled it on its tail and threw it. Then like some pro wrestler I jumped on it and my feet landed on it’s torso. > Slam! Felt good!”
>
> “This isn’t the first time I’ve killed a cat but this time it’s different. It didn’t occur to me back then that
> the cat had a leash. So I think somebody owns it. Well it’s very well loved in NIP from what I heard and I just ended it’s life. So there you go I’m sorry. And I wont be striking another one for maybe about a month.”
>
> Questions about Candare’s state of mind cropped up when blog-readers came across these statements from the 19-year old student:  “It feels good when you’re beating it (a cat) up but you suddenly feel something strange when it turns off permanently. That’s how I feel right now. And maybe for the next days. Dang, am I a cat serial killer?”
>
> “It is alarming when a prestigious university declares that there is “no misconduct” in killing a helpless kitten in plain view of fellow students right within the school premises,” said Nancy Cu Unjieng, President of Compassion and Responsibility for Animals (CARA), the animal welfare organization that filed the instant complaint before the UP Tribunal.
>
> Anna Cabrera, Program Director of The Philippine Animal Welfare Society (PAWS), agreed that the dismissal was “a dangerous precedent for a university to make”.
>
> In a statement to the press, PAWS said: “The violence and deliberateness of the act which should have evoked outrage from school officials and a call for immediate disciplinary action was instead met with a shrug of the shoulders and a pronouncement that ‘killing animals – though it is a national crime – is, as ‘not even classified as an actionable misconduct under the university’s Rules.’”
>
>
> “What message is the Tribunal sending out? Basically, it is implied that students can openly hurt animals and not face any consequences for their actions. We think that it is deplorable and shameful for an institution not to strongly condemn acts of animal cruelty,” commented Cabrera.
>
> The three-member UP Tribunal composed  of Ma. Crisanta Flores, Ma. Theresa Payongayong and Chairman Jonathan P. Sale stated in its Resolution that:  While “it is true that Section 1 of the (Rules and Regulations on Student Conduct and Discipline) RRSCD states that, as the basis of discipline, ‘ a student shall at all times observe the laws of the land..’ and that part of the law of the land is Republic Act No. 8485 (the Animal Welfare Act), Section 6 of which makes it unlawful for anyone to torture or maltreat animals; and that Mr. Candare did to the kitten clearly constitutes maltreatment , if not outright torture… not all violations of laws are actionable misconducts.”
>
> “Candare’s actions – deplorable though they may seem to some, if not most, people, do not constitute any
> misconduct actionable under University rules.”

> “Consequently, it is thus respectfully recommended that the Tribunal DISMISS the instant complaint”
>
> Violation  of the Animal Welfare Act is considered a criminal act punishable  with six months up to two
> years imprisonment or a fine ranging from P1000 to P5000.
>
> While recorded prosecutions under this special law have been few since its approval in 1998, PAWS, who spearheaded the lobbying of the said law, is slowly making headway by helping an increasing number of ordinary citizens file cases against animal offenders in Court.
>
> PAWS filed a criminal case against Candare before the QC Hall of Justice where the case is for resolution at the QC Prosecutor’s Office.
>

Let us try to imagine the psychic makeup of this U.P. student. He wrote in his blog:  “I pulled it on its tail and threw it. Then like some pro wrestler I jumped on it and my feet landed on it’s (sic) torso. Slam! Felt good”

Wow! He imagined himself in a wrestling match with a kitty! After throwing the poor little kitty, he jumped on its tiny body and he felt good about it. Is he sick or not?

Then he wrote: “This isn’t the first time I’ve killed a cat but this time it’s different. It didn’t occur to me back then that the cat had a leash. So I think somebody owns it. Well it’s very well loved in NIP from what I heard and I just ended it’s life. So there you go I’m sorry. And I wont be striking another one for maybe about a month.”

This kid Candare admitted that he was used to killing cats but this time, the cat had a leash. He even knew the cat – that it was “well-loved” by people from the National Institute of Physics, his very own College/Institute. He claimed he was sorry so he wouldn’t kill another cat for “about a month”. Is he mentally deranged or not?

The physics student then went on to write: “It feels good when you’re beating it (a cat) up but you suddenly feel something strange when it turns off permanently. That’s how I feel right now. And maybe for the next days. Dang, am I a cat serial killer?”

He admits he gets high when beating cats. He wonders if he were indeed a cat serial killer. Is he of sound mind or not?

Apparently, his elders at the University of the Philippines-Diliman think of him as a perfectly sane student.

CONVOLUTED LOGIC

According to the UP tribunal, such misconduct is not considered “actionable” even if such conduct is obviously against the law, in this case, the Animal Welfare Act or RA 8485.

I wonder how these illogical professors decide whether an act is “actionable” or not. The killing of the cat was done within the school premises. And the act itself was against the law.

If students are caught plagiarizing, they can be expelled from the university. Yet there are no laws – national or municipal – against plagiarism.

Is copying a paragraph or two from other people’s work much worse than torturing and killing cats? I wonder if killing or torturing a person within the UP premises would be considered “actionable” by the UP Tribunal.

MENTAL STATE OF MURDERERS

Is there really a big difference between killers of cats and killers of humans? According to PeTa (People for the ethical Treatment of Animals), there is a direct link between cruelty to animals and cruelty to humans. Below was taken from their site PeTA Media Center:

Cruelty to Animals: The First of Many Crimes?
Acts of cruelty to animals are not mere indications of a minor personality flaw in the abuser; they are symptomatic of a deep mental disturbance. Research in psychology and criminology shows that people who commit acts of cruelty to animals don’t stop there—many of them move on to their fellow humans.

Studies have shown that violent and aggressive criminals are more likely to have abused animals as children than criminals considered non-aggressive.(2) A survey of psychiatric patients who had repeatedly tortured dogs and cats found that all of them had high levels of aggression toward people as well.(3)  According to a New South Wales newspaper, a police study in Australia revealed that “100 percent of sexual homicide offenders examined had a history of animal cruelty.”(4)  To researchers, a fascination with cruelty to animals is a red flag in the lives of serial killers and rapists; according to the FBI’s Ressler, “These are the kids who never learned it’s wrong to poke out a puppy’s eyes.”(5)

Examples That Make the Headlines: Notorious Killers
History is replete with serial killers whose violent tendencies were first directed at animals. Albert DeSalvo, the “Boston Strangler,” who killed 13 women, trapped dogs and cats and shot arrows at them through boxes in his youth.(6) Serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer had impaled frogs, cats, and dogs’ heads on sticks.(7)  Dennis Rader, the so-called “BTK” killer, who terrorized people in Kansas, wrote in a chronological account of his childhood that he hanged a dog and a cat.(8)  During the trial of convicted sniper Lee Boyd Malvo, a psychology professor testified that the teenager, who killed 10 people with a rifle, had “pelted—and probably killed—numerous cats with marbles from a slingshot when he was about 14.”(9)

The deadly violence that has shattered schools in recent years has, in most cases, begun with cruelty to animals. High-school killers such as 15-year-old Kip Kinkel in Springfield, Oregon, and Luke Woodham, 16, in Pearl, Mississippi, tortured animals before starting their shooting sprees.(10)  Columbine High School students Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, who shot and killed 12 classmates before turning their guns on themselves, spoke of mutilating animals to their classmates.(11)

“There is a common theme to all of the shootings of recent years,” says Dr. Harold S. Koplewicz, director of the Child Study Center at New York University. “You have a child who has symptoms of aggression toward his peers, an interest in fire, cruelty to animals, social isolation, and many warning signs that the school has ignored.”(12)

Sadly, many of these criminals’ childhood violence went unexamined—until it was directed at humans.

 

 

SERIAL CAT KILLERS AND MASS MURDERERS

The recent Maguindanao mass murder shocked Filipinos and the world. But tortures, beheadings, massacres, etc. have been part of life in the Philippines since Ferdinand Marcos’s reign of terror.

I remember in the 1970s, a top Marcos official (and still a top Philippine official) was supposed to have an unusual hobby. He collected ears of dead Moros.

In the George Bush, Jr. era, torture was officially promoted. According to the Bush-Cheney doctrine, it is not torture if the person remains alive. But even with their very limited definition, it was proven that torture was committed in Guantanamo. The tortured prisoner died.

I suppose we can all expect more tortures and massacres because our schools, the leaders of the country’s “national university”, the University of the Philippines tolerate animal torturers and serial killers.

If I were a betting man, I would wager a million bucks that most, if not all those who participated in the mass murder in Maguindanao were/are also animal torturers and killers.

2 thoughts on “MAGUINDANAO MASS MURDERERS and the U.P. SERIAL CAT KILLER

  1. You wrote of Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold speaking with some of their classmates about mutilating animals. What is your source on this statement, please? Because that’s the one thing that I’ve never heard or read about either of them. In fact, several books written about Columbine and in particular Harris and Klebold say just the opposite, and that with Harris in particular it’s one of few criteria that he doesn’t match up with in terms of him being diagnosed as a psychopath, that of showing cruelty towards animals. In none of his personal papers does Harris ever mention wanting to harm animals and in fact shows compassion towards his own dog and towards animals in general. I’ve never read about Klebold showing cruelty towards animals either. I’d be very interested in who or what your source is on this information.

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